Management   |   Patient advice   |   Grading

 

Adverse event management:
decreased appetite

Management recommendations1,2

If possible, the first step in treating decreased appetite is to address the underlying cause:

  • Addressing symptoms of nausea may help improve appetite
  • Treatment for any conditions such as mouth sores, dry mouth, pain or depression may help
    to improve appetite
  • Additional treatments for appetite loss and associated weight loss may include medications that
    increase appetite, medications that help food move through the intestine and nutritional supplements

Grade 1–2:

  • Continue GIOTRIF® (afatinib) treatment at current dose

Grade ≥3 or intolerable Grade 2:

  • Interrupt GIOTRIF® (afatinib), resuming treatment at a reduced dose (10 mg lower) if patient recovers to grade ≤1. Permanent discontinuation should be considered in patients who cannot tolerate 20 mg/day of GIOTRIF® (afatinib) treatment

 


Advice for patients1

  • Eat 5–6 small meals a day and snack when hungry
  • Identify the times of day when usually hungry − eat at those times and do not limit the amount eaten
  • Eat nutritious snacks that are high in calories and protein, such as dried fruits, nuts, yogurt, cheeses, eggs, milkshakes, ice cream, cereal and muesli bars
  • Drink fluids between meals, instead of with meals, to avoid filling up too quickly
  • When too tired to shop/cook, ask family members or friends for help; consider buying pre-cooked meals
  • If the smell or taste of food brings on nausea, eat cold/room temperature food to decrease odour and reduce taste
  • Meet with a dietitian for additional advice on meal planning

Grading3

Grade 1

Grade 2

Grade 3

Grade 4

Loss of appetite without alteration in eating habits

Oral intake altered without significant weight loss or malnutrition; oral nutritional supplements indicated

Associated with significant weight loss or malnutrition (e.g. inadequate oral caloric and/or fluid intake); tube feeding or TPN indicated

Life-threatening consequences

Grade 1

Loss of appetite without alteration in eating habits

Grade 2

Oral intake altered without significant weight loss or malnutrition; oral nutritional supplements indicated

Grade 3

Associated with significant weight loss or malnutrition (e.g. inadequate oral caloric and/or fluid intake); tube feeding or TPN indicated

Grade 4

Life-threatening consequences

 

Adapted from CTCAE version 3.3


CTCAE=Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, TPN=total parenteral nutrition


References

1
Cancer.Net. Appetite Loss. Available at: www.cancer.net/all-about-cancer/treating-cancer/managing-side-effects/ap.... Last accessed April 2019.
2
GIOTRIF® (afatinib) Summary of Product Characteristics, 2018.
3
Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) Version 3.0.

Back to top

This site uses cookies to improve your browsing experience. By using this site, you agree to their use.

Cookie policy
I am a Healthcare Professional outside the US and UK

I am a Healthcare Professional outside the US and UK

Click here for international product information intended for Healthcare Professionals about afatinib for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment.

I am not a Healthcare Professional and I am outside the US and the UK

I am not a Healthcare Professional and I am outside the US and the UK

Click here for general international information about afatinib for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment.

Country-specific product information

Country-specific product information

Click here for country-specific product information intended for Healthcare Professionals about afatinib for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment.